Apocalypse Veil 

Combining sculptural headgear and film photography, the photo series explores isolation, queerness and natural environments amidst anxieties for the end of the world in fragmented folkloric documents.

Anderson Matthew photographed collaborator Dylan Zarate, who performed wearing several “apocalypse veils” — rudimentary protective garments created from salvaged materials by the artist Rachel Elizabeth Jones. The images were created around Yosemite Valley and the eastern Sierras in California.

“Apocalypse” comes from the Greek apokalypsis, meaning an uncovering or a lifting of the veil. A a multivalent and historically gendered garment, the veil is a potent symbol for exploring boundaries, barriers, and shades of visibility. Shot on expired 35mm, the veiled subject appears as an apparition existing between layers and planes; it is as if the photographer has found / been found by a ghost in the forest and the pair abscond to an old hotel to share secrets and tenderness amidst a present darkness.

Book available for purchase here.


Published by Collected Projects

5" x 8" x .25"

82 pages

Released: February 26, 2021

Design by Matthew Anderson

Edited by Matthew Anderson, Rachel Elizabeth Jones and Dylan Zarate.




LA Metaphysical Library Journal #4, Veil (October 2019)

A collaborative feature by Anderson Matthew, Rachel Elizabeth Jones and Dylan Zarate is featured in Veil, the fourth quarterly journal publication from LA Metaphysical Library, a Los Angeles based mobile library.


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